Grief, Loss and Creativity

Yesterday the world lost an incredibly talented comedian and actor. He was a man who saw me through my childhood, teens, twenties and beyond with an equal measure of thought-provoking moments and good humour. But it was no surprise to hear that the star of Dead Poets Society and Goodwill Hunting had also been battling … Continue reading Grief, Loss and Creativity

Fact and Fiction: How to Weave Both Elements into a Good Book

While the general categories of fiction and non-fiction are distinct book categories in the publishing world, there is good reason to tie the two together in your novels. It will technically still be classed as fiction, but a combination of the two can be really powerful. My debut novel, Take Me to the Castle,  was … Continue reading Fact and Fiction: How to Weave Both Elements into a Good Book

Hemmingway’s Tip Of The Iceberg: Omit What the Reader Knows

If a writer of prose knows enough of what he is writing about he may omit things that he knows and the reader, if the writer is writing truly enough, will have a feeling of those things as strongly as though the writer had stated them. The dignity of movement of an ice-berg is due … Continue reading Hemmingway’s Tip Of The Iceberg: Omit What the Reader Knows

F. Scott Fitzgerald on the Secret of Great Writing

F. Scott Fitzgerald on the Secret of Great Writing by Maria Popova “Nothing any good isn’t hard.” What is the secret of great writing? For David Foster Wallace, it was about fun. For Henry Miller, about discovery. Susan Sontag saw it asself-exploration. Many literary greats anchored it to their daily routines. And yet, the answer remains elusive and ever-changing. … Continue reading F. Scott Fitzgerald on the Secret of Great Writing